reviews

JiME Reviews Dec 2015

Here is the latest list of books available for review from JiME.  If you’re interested in reviewing any of the following then get in touch with me through Twitter or via rob.farrow [at] open.ac.uk to let me know which volume you are interested in and some of your reviewer credentials.

Reviews will be due at the end of February 2016, and should be in the region of 1500-2000 words.  You can see examples of previous reviews at http://jime.open.ac.uk/.

If you’re an academic publisher and you’re reading this you my have noted we have a lot of books from Routledge in the backlog.  If you’d like to have your books considered fro review in JiME then please mail them for my attention at the address in the sidebar.


  • Curtis J. Bonk, Mimi M. Lee, Thomas C. Reeves & Thomas H. Reynolds (eds.) (2015) MOOCs and Open Education around the world. Routledge: Abingdon and New York. link
  • Charles D. Dziuban, Anthony G. Picciano, Charles R. Graham & Patsy D. Moskal (2016). Conducting Research in Online and Blended Learning Environments.  Routledge: Abingdon and New York. link
  • Susan Garvis & Narelle Lemon (eds.) (2016). Understanding Digital Technologies and Young Children: An International Perspective. Routledge: Abingdon and New York. link
  • Seth Giddings (2014). Gameworlds: Virtual Media and Children’s Everyday Play. Bloomsbury Academic. link
  • Lori Diane Hill & Felice J. Levine (eds.) (2015). World Education Research Yearbook 2015. Routledge: Abingdon. link
  • Wanda Hurren & Erika Hasebe-Ludt (eds.) (2014). Contemplating Curriculum – Genealogies, Times, Places. Routledge: London and New York.  link
  • Phyllis Jones (ed.) (2014).  Bringing Insider Perspectives into Inclusive Learner Teaching – Potentials and challenges for educational professionals. Routledge: London and New York. link
  • David Killick (2015). Developing the Global Student: Higher education in an era of globalization. Routledge: London and New York. link
  • Piet A. M. Kommers, Pedro Isaias & Tomayess Issa (2015). Perspectives on Social Media – a yearbook. Routledge: London and New York. link
  • Angela McFarlane (2015). Authentic Learning for the Digital Generation – realising the potential of technology in the classroom. Routledge: Abingdon. link
  • Jill Porter (ed.) (2015). Understanding and Responding to the Experience of Disability. Routledge: London and New York. link
  • Steven Warburton & Stylianos Hatzipanagos (eds.) (2013). Digital Identity and Social Media.  IGI Global: Hershey, PA.  link
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JiME Reviews June 2014

This is the current list of books for review in the Journal of Interactive Media in Education (JiME) at the moment – if you’re interested in reviewing any of the following then get in touch with me through Twitter or via rob.farrow [at] open.ac.uk to let me know which volume you are interested in and some of your reviewer credentials.

Wanda Hurren & Erika Hasebe-Ludt (eds.) (2014). Contemplating Curriculum – Genealogies, Times, Places. Routledge: London and New York.  link

Phyllis Jones (ed.) (2014).  Bringing Insider Perspectives into Inclusive Learner Teaching – Potentials and challenges for educational professionals. Routledge: London and New York. link

Marilyn Leask & Norbert Pachler (eds.) (2014).  Learning to Teach Using ICT in the Secondary School – A companion to school experience.  Routledge: London and New York. link

Steven Warburton & Stylianos Hatzipanagos (eds.) (2013). Digital Identity and Social Media.  IGI Global: Hershey, PA.  link

Simone White & Michael Corbett (eds.) (2014). Doing Educational Research in Rural Settings. Methodological issues, international perspectives and practical solutions. Routledge: Abingdon.  link

A Battle for Open?

Martin Weller has a thought-provoking editorial in the latest issue of JiME.  He argues that many of the battles for open education have been won but that the movement now faces the challenge of balancing all kinds of different aims and aspirations.  Is openness about freedom?  Is this an argument about business models or a philosophy of education?

These questions are couched in a wider narrative about finding pathways through times of change (especially rapid change or revolution). We often only see the underlying patterns of historical forces in retrospect:  as the philosopher Hegel tells us, the owl of Minerva ‘flies only at dusk’.  Not only are the issues complex and conflated; there is also the small matter of the education publishing industry that is keen to protect billions of dollars of revenue.  With all this is mind it can be hard to focus on the more prosaic problems we face on a day-to-day basis.

Martin appeals to the same ‘greenwashing’ analogy that Hal Plotkin used when I spoke with him in Washington DC earlier this year.  Nowadays environmental friendliness has penetrated the mainstream so successfully it can be hard to recall the way many corporations and lobbyists fought against a small environmental movement.  Brands are more than happy to present themselves as ‘green’ where before they denied the value of such a thing.  Their redefinition is known as ‘greenwashing’ and shows how a message can be co-opted by organisations which would appear at first to be excluded.  Can we say the same thing about open education as commercial providers become ‘providers of OER’?

Martin does a great job of showing why ‘battle’ might be an appropriate metaphor for what’s going on.  In the case of open access publishing, for instance, incumbent publishers want to preserve profits but open models have allowed new entrants into the market.  These new publication models are immediately thrust into challenges of scale and sustainability that can make it hard to preserve the openness that was the original impetus.

I won’t try to present any more of the argument here – it’s well worth reading in full.  But here’s the conclusion for the gist of it:

Openness has been successful in being accepted as an approach in higher education and widely adopted as standard practice. In this sense it has been victorious, but this can be seen as only the first stage in a longer, ongoing battle around the nature that openness should take. There are now more nuanced and detailed areas to be addressed, like a number of battles on different fronts. After the initial success of openness as a general ethos then the question becomes not ‘do you want to be open?’ but rather ‘what type of openness do you want?’ Determining the nature of openness in a range of contexts so that it retains its key benefits as an approach is the next major focus for the open education movement.

Open approaches complement the ethos of higher education, and also provide the means to produce innovation in a range of its central practices. Such innovation is both necessary and desirable to maintain the role and function of universities as they adapt. It is essential therefore that institutions and practitioners within higher education have ownership of these changes and an appreciation of what openness means. To allow others to dictate what form these open practices should take will be to abdicate responsibility for the future of education itself.

JiME Reviews Apr 2013

I have a copy of the following book available for anyone who would like to review it for JiME.  Just let me know if you are interested…

Jenkins, H., Kelley, W., Clinton, K., McWilliams, J., Pitts-Wiley, R. and Reilly, E. (eds.) (2013). Reading in a Participatory Culture: Remixing Moby Dick in the English Classroom.  Teachers College Press: New York.

You can find out a bit more about the volume here or at Amazon.

JiME Reviews Feb 2012

We currently have the following books available for review at the Journal of Interactive Media in Technology.  Please forward these details to anyone who might be interested in being a reviewer for us.  If you’d like to nominate yourself as a reviewer, please email rob.farrow [at] open.ac.uk or tweet philosopher1978.

Dede, Chris and Richards, John (eds.) (2012). Digital Teaching Platforms: Customizing Classroom Learning for Each Student. The Teachers College Press, Columbia University: New York. 224+vi pp.  (see http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/4/prweb9383596.htm)

McDonald, J. P., Mannheimer Zydney, J., Dichter, A., and McDonald, E. C. (2012).  Going Online with Protocols: New Tools for Teaching & Learning.  The Teachers College Press, Columbia University: New York. 128+xi pp. (see http://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Going_Online_With_Protocols.html?id=r8sz3UMWo7YC&redir_esc=y)

Goh, T.-T., Seet, B.-C., and Sun, P.-C. (2012).  E-Books & E-Readers for E-Learning.  Victoria Business School, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.  Available from https://sites.google.com/site/drgoh88/e-books-and-e-readers-for-e-learning.

Information about house style may be found at http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/jime/about/submissions#authorGuidelines.